Know Your Neighbor: Regina Romero

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Regina Romero knows how to turn a hobby into an enjoyable family business.

She first discovered beading and making jewelry through observation, imagination and research. A few years later, this interest inspired Bead Creations, a business wedged between Brodsky Bookshop and Bear Claw Bakery.

The shop owner confessed, “I knew nothing about beads except that I liked them. I could see many possibilities. I talked to people, I read and looked for information on the internet.” Her research led to more interest in the subject. She began creating jewelry in November 2014. In February 2016, she had a desire to open a bead shop. By April 13, 2016, Romero opened the business Bead Creations.

The shop offers a delightful treat for the eyes. The large picture window showcases some finished jewelry, creating the desire for a more complete view of the premises. Inside the store, many signs line the wall. Each colorful decorated wooden board carries a message about occurrences in a person’s life. Romero’s personal favorite reads: “The first one to apologize is the bravest. The first one to forgive is the strongest. The first to forget is the happiest.”

Along the walls and throughout the shop, a large selection of beads tempts one to create a beautiful necklace of Czech beads or stained-glass crystals. African beads could possibly become a fashionable bracelet. If one doesn't want to create a piece of jewelry, there’s always the possibility of purchasing custom items made by Romero or her daughter, Miquela. Their work includes necklaces, bracelets, earrings and rosaries, including mala beads for Buddhism.

On occasion, a person enters the store and wishes to create a piece of jewelry, but doesn’t know how to do so. Regina Romero has an answer for this dilemma. She offers one-on-one jewelry-making classes custom prepared for the specific project the student wishes to create.

Regarding the stones themselves, Romero said, “You don’t always pick the stones; they pick you. Natural stones have a vibration all their own. This natural occurring vibration is meant for a specific person. Massage therapists successfully use stones on their patients for good results.”

The shop owner mentioned other aspects of her business, such as jewelry repair. She enjoys making a piece functional once more.

She prides herself on the family’s involvement in her business. When needed, Romero’s husband of 20 years, outdoorsman Miguel Romero, leaves his cattle and firewood work to help at the store. She, in turn, helps with office work for his outfitting guide business. Daughter Miquela Romero, a Centinel Bank employee and medical assistant student, remains an integral part of the business. Her sons, Mateo and Marcos, lend a helping hand upon request. Regina Romero's parents, Orlando and Flora Archuleta, form a support system that’s always available. “This is a family-oriented and family-friendly business,” she said.

Another benefit to shop ownership is meeting the visitors who drop in to Bead Creations. “I love to meet people. From the moment they walk in the door, I realize that people come into my life for a reason. I must learn from people whose paths I cross. Time spent here is never wasted,” Romero added. Part of her conversations with tourists include sharing the history of Taos.  

Romero saved the biggest perk of her current work for the last. “Grandmas (nanas) should always be available for their little ones. In my case, it’s possible for me to sit on the floor of the business and play with my granddaughter, 7-month-old Marianna,” she said with a broad smile.

The shop is open Monday through Saturday from 10 a.m. to 6 p.m. and Sunday from 11 a.m. to 3 p.m.

Not all of Regina Romero’s time and energy focuses on Bead Creations. When she’s not involved with business interests, she does “mom things,” meaning time for family enjoyment. Romero makes a sweet version of chile caribe and grows tomatoes in the greenhouse on the family home property in Arroyo Hondo. She likes to see the aspens turn color from her home and read works by Rudolfo Anaya and Jodi Picoult.

By far, her greatest passion includes genealogy. She uses old records, stories and letters to understand her family’s origins. “I traced my family’s roots back to the 1500s with one of the Oñate expeditions. There’s lots of family in there … and that includes people with the surnames Martinez, Archuleta, Romero, Mondragon and Torres. I find it quite fascinating," she said. "I have a genealogy wall with pictures and remember what our ancestors had to endure for us to be here today. I have a great feel for how different life was for our ancestors."

Ultimately, Romero hopes to visit Spain to spend time researching the Martin Serrano and Archuleta lines. She has visited Hawaii and, along with her husband, takes the children to snow-related vacation trips. Past sites include Copper Resort and Telluride. A memorable family trip involved a monthlong road trip from New Mexico to most of the Western states. 

Travel remains interesting to Regina Archuleta Romero, but the home front pulls at the heartstrings. That little tug encourages her to advise others to “shop local. Doing so helps the economy." 

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