Tempo

The 'big bang' is now

Reconnecting with the creator, putting spirit into form

Posted 4/3/20

All humans are creators. It's not something we just do on Saturdays, or when we graduate from art school or retire from the 9-to-5 grind. Every human being, indeed, all life itself, is one big bang of nonstop, emerging, engaging, intensifying and expressive creativity.

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Tempo

The 'big bang' is now

Reconnecting with the creator, putting spirit into form

Posted

All humans are creators. It's not something we just do on Saturdays, or when we graduate from art school or retire from the 9-to-5 grind. Every human being, indeed, all life itself, is one big bang of nonstop, emerging, engaging, intensifying and expressive creativity.

Because most of us are not usually conscious of our incessant creativity, it's fascinating to see what professional creators, like artists of Taos, are doing during this relatively unprecedented pan-demonium created by the official mandate to self-quarantine during the coronavirus disease outbreak.

All conscious creators, from poets to painters to pregnant moms, learn to develop a greater tolerance for uncertainty because they have faith that "something" is coming - a baby or some other beautiful child of their imagination is soon to appear.

A few art professionals and artists of Taos commented on the importance of art during the forced closure of so-called "nonessential" operations.

"This is such an odd time," Max Jones, of Jones Walker of Taos Gallery on Bent Street, said in an email. "Since the gallery is closed, I've been able to spend some good creative time in my studio. The 'not knowing' what is to come has been really unsettling to me. Studio time has been very therapeutic because it has provided a distraction from what is going on. Also, it's an environment where I actually have control over what happens. That feels very reassuring right now. Also, the work I've been creating seems very happy. I think I'm over-compensating for the heaviness in my heart at the moment. I guess by the time this crisis is over I'll have a big stack of 'happy' I can then send out into the world." (joneswalkeroftaos.com)

David Mapes of David Anthony Fine Art on Kit Carson Road finds a similarly challenging atmosphere.

"Normally one to be calm in extreme circumstances - this is distracting," Mapes said by email. "Fortunately, I have many interests and a workshop I can work in. Getting in the creative mode is always a good place to be, but getting there can be slow, especially if you have family and financial worries. I'm using the time to prepare for when I do reopen my gallery and imagining what opportunities may be present. Also having quality time to work on furniture orders is something I want to take advantage of, maybe slip in something new to work on for my own joy."

As Taos Gallery Association president, Mapes also urges artists and galleries to put work up online, a bandwagon Taos has been rather slow to jump on board. "This can't last long - most humans just aren't geared to enjoy isolation for too long. Looking forward to hugging somebody!" exclaimed Mapes. (davidanthonyfineart.com)

The forced isolation of self-quarantine seems an exact mirror of current events and the perfect antidote to a world that has ultimately valued profit over people. Lysa Montwill, artist and gallerist at Dragonfly Blue gallery, across from DAFA Fine Art, said by email she feels a wee guilty pleasure with it all.

"I would confess to enjoying the time I have on hand to catch up on projects and spend with my cats. Ironically it feels selfish while being in the category of unselfishness. The inability to venture out for new art supplies provides the perfect scenario to use what is on hand. To be human and adapt. There is something satisfying about that.

"All in all it's an opportunity to embrace," Montwill concluded. "In my opinion, fighting and complaining about it isn't productive. Our greatest ability as human beings is our resiliency and adaptive nature. We can accomplish the tasks ahead with compassion and thoughtfulness once acceptance occurs." (dragonflyblue.com)

De-emphasizing art is the tack Georgia Gersh of Magpie gallery is taking, honoring for herself and her artists that art can be very hard work and a little R&R is well-deserved.

"On a personal note, I have not made art a priority," Gersh said about her own process. "I have little projects like papier-mâché and jewelry that are meditative and calming. I think there will be some exciting art to come out of this period and I look forward to showing some of it at Magpie." (magpietaos.com)

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