Facebook again: Oops!

Social media giant alerts users to another privacy glitch

By Staci Matlock
editor@taosnews.com
Posted 6/8/18

If you shared on Facebook a slightly embarrassing photo of yourself or vented at your boss and shared it only with friends between May 18-22, better double check the settings.

On Thursday …

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Facebook again: Oops!

Social media giant alerts users to another privacy glitch

Posted

If you posted a slightly embarrassing photo of yourself on Facebook or vented at your boss and shared it only with friends between May 18-22, better double check the privacy settings.

On Thursday (June 7), Facebook acknowledged a glitch in the audience selection for posts during those four days. Essentially, some 14 million Facebook users may have posted stuff they marked as private or for friends only in that time, but the bug in the Facebook audience selection automatically made all new posts public. 

Oops!

"To be clear, this bug did not impact anything people had posted before, and they could still choose their audience just as they always have," wrote Erin Egan, chief privacy officer for Facebook in a statement to media. 

Egan said the problem has been fixed. 
"Out of an abundance of caution we are letting anyone affected know today and asking them to review Facebook posts they made during that time," Egan said in the statement. "If you posted publicly, you'll see a notification when you log in that leads to a page with more information - including a review of posts during this period.

New Mexico Attorney General Hector Balderas, who has joined 40 other states and territories in suing Facebook over another privacy issue earlier this year, sent out a consumer alert Friday regarding the latest Facebook problem.

"While no one should have their data disclosed to a company without their consent, the danger here goes deeper than that," Balderas said. "Hackers and scammers use social media platforms to identify victims, and social media companies must be responsible for the protection of their users."

Facebook came under scrutiny and Congressional tongue-lashing earlier this year when it was reported that the company gave cell phone makers and political research firms access to users' information without their knowledge or consent.

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