Cats in hats and other medicinal remedies for kids

By Tempo staff
Posted 2/26/20

Theodor Seuss Geisel was an American children's author, political cartoonist, illustrator, poet, animator, screenwriter and filmmaker who single-handedly forged a new genre of art that falls somewhere between the Surrealist movement of the early 20th century and the inspired nonsense of a child's classroom doodles.

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Cats in hats and other medicinal remedies for kids

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Theodor Seuss Geisel was an American children's author, political cartoonist, illustrator, poet, animator, screenwriter and filmmaker who single-handedly forged a new genre of art that falls somewhere between the Surrealist movement of the early 20th century and the inspired nonsense of a child's classroom doodles.

He is best known for his work writing and illustrating more than 60 books under the pen name Dr. Seuss. His work includes many of the most popular children's books of all time, selling over 600 million copies and being translated into more than 20 languages by the time of his death in 1991.

Born in 1904, in Springfield, Massachusetts, Geisel began his career as a little-known editorial cartoonist during the 1920s. His unique and fresh concepts ignited his career, and his work evolved quickly to include illustrations, sculpture as well as oil paintings. His art became the springboard from which he delivered children's books, more than 400 World War II political cartoons, as well as hundreds of advertisements and countless editorials filled with whimsical animals, characters and humor.

Geisel adopted the name "Dr. Seuss" as a graduate student at Lincoln College, Oxford. He left Oxford in 1927 to begin his career as an illustrator and cartoonist for "Vanity Fair," "Life" and various other publications.

He published his first children's book "And to Think That I Saw It on Mulberry Street" in 1937. During World War II, he took a brief hiatus from children's literature to illustrate political cartoons, and also worked in the animation and film department of the United States Army, where he wrote, produced and animated many productions, including "Design for Death," which later won the 1947 Academy Award for Best Documentary Feature.

After the war, Geisel returned to producing children's books, writing classics including "The Cat in the Hat" and "How the Grinch Stole Christmas!" His books spawned numerous adaptations, including 11 television specials, five feature films, a Broadway musical and four television series.

Geisel's birthday, March 2, has been adopted as the annual date for National Read Across America Day, an initiative on reading created by the National Education Association.

The nation's largest celebration of reading, the events over the week of Monday-Friday (March 2-6) anticipate that more than 45 million readers, both young and old, will pick up a book and read.

To celebrate the fun and value of reading, the town of Taos Community Events, Taos Youth and Family Center, Friends of the Public Library, Op. Cit. Books, Paso a Paso Children Count, SOMOS, Taos Municipal Schools SRCL Grant Literacy Coaches, Twirl Play and Discovery Space, Taos Academy of Performing Arts, Taos Academy Charter School National Honor Society, Taos Children's Library and Walgreens are all asking you to join NEA and many of America's leading literacy, youth and civic groups in bringing a nation of readers together for a flurry of reading excitement.

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